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Former Ole Miss Student to Plead Guilty Over Noose on James Meredith Statue

By Amelia Camurati
By Amelia Camurati

Today at 11 a.m., the second of three Ole Miss students who placed a noose and the former state flag of Georgia bearing the Confederate battle emblem on the James Meredith statue will plead guilty before U.S. District Judge Michael Mills in Oxford.

According federal court filings, Austin Reed Edenfield plans to waive indictment to plead guilty to a criminal charge stemming from that incident. He was scheduled to plead guilty in September 2015, but Judge Mills continued that hearing to today, March 24.

Federal prosecutors showed in their factual basis documents (used in Graeme Phillip Harris’ case) that Austin Reed Edenfield was drinking with Graeme Phillips Harris at the now-closed Sigma Phi Epsilon house that night on February 15, 2014, when Harris decided that “he wanted to create a sensation on campus using a Confederate flag.”

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HottyToddy.com will update this story with the sentencing Judge Mills may pass down to Austin Reed Edenfield today.


Callie Daniels Bryant is the senior managing editor of HottyToddy.com. She can be reached at callie.daniels@hottytoddy.com.

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